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I hope you will allow me a small space in your publication to commend the civil aviation security staff at the Marsh Harbour International Airport. They do a commendable job and are usually quite courteous and never dally or delay the efficient processing of travellers into the secure departure terminal.

Confiscating Lighters

Letters to the Editor

Dear Editor,

I hope you will allow me a small space in your publication to commend the civil aviation security staff at the Marsh Harbour International Airport.  They do a commendable job and are usually quite courteous and never dally or delay the efficient processing of travellers into the secure departure terminal.

I have always been exceptionally impressed with their diligence in securing any cigarette lighters that risk bringing down an airplane after leaving our wonderful airport terminal.  I have travelled around the Bahamas and flown out of airports on Eleuthera, Inagua, Freeport, Great Exuma, San Salvador, Bimini and Long Island. And on all of these trips the security staff at those airports have never been so diligent as to confiscate a lighter.

Thank goodness no one has ever hijacked a plane after departing those locations in the Bahamas.

But what perplexes me is that the security personnel at Nassau International are not directed to relieve me of a lighter.

I am told that Marsh Harbour airport has an entirely different directive and security measures to those of the Capitol. I was told that the “two companies have different standards”?

So that means that the directive of what is permitted on a plane in the Bahamas is determined by “the company” and not the government authority which I believe is called the Department of Civil Aviation.

How can there be two different standards within the same country?

Further I have travelled all over the USA and to the UK and never was a lighter or matches confiscated.

I would suggest to the person in charge that if there is such a directive then why is it not posted within or at the entrance to the security screening hall? Should passengers not be forewarned to check their lighter before entering the hall? What if someone happens to be traveling with a particularly valuable ignition instrument and it is confiscated? Or is this perhaps a way to help supplement the operating costs of the airport to ensure the bathrooms have toilet paper?

Yours truly,

A Travelling Bahamian

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