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The community of Cherokee Sound added one more feather to its cap on Whit Monday, June 9, when it hosted a Quilting Exhibition and Handicraft show in the community centre. Cherokee Sound is noted for its very interesting and varied shows which, over the years, have included art shows, sea shell exhibitions, dolls, teddy bears, angels and nativity shows.

Cherokee Quilt and Handicraft Show brings community together

Quilt Show

The community of Cherokee Sound added one more feather to its cap on Whit Monday, June 9, when it hosted a Quilting Exhibition and Handicraft show in the community centre. Cherokee Sound is noted for its very interesting and varied shows which, over the years, have included art shows, sea shell exhibitions, dolls, teddy bears, angels and nativity shows.

This was the first time, however, for a quilt and handicrafts show and what a very interesting exhibition it was.

The exhibition was open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and there was a steady stream of visitors throughout the day. The variety of work on display was amazing. Lee Pinder, coordinator of the show, was especially keen to share these beautiful and unique pieces of handiwork with others. Quilts ranged from brand new to antique, several of them dating back sixty, eighty and even one hundred years.

While in the past all quilts were entirely hand stitched some quilts today are still made entirely by hand but many are made using sewing machines. It is a great testament to the craftsmanship of ladies in the past that the antique quilts which have been in constant use and passed down through families are still in such good condition.

It was interesting to see all the very different patterns of these quilts which utilized all the colours of the rainbow. One particularly unusual one was a ‘Double wedding ring quilt’ which was handmade in 1933 as a wedding gift to the grandparents of Cindy Pinder of Casuarina Point by the bride’s sister. Two very unusual ‘tied quilts’ aged about fifty years were made by a Ms. Hattie and found in the her house when bought by Guy Mather.

The two hundred year old quilts on display were made by Grace Meadows, grandmother of Lee Pinder, and a lady named Grace Meadows.

Several of the newer quilts were made by ‘The Saturday Afternoon Cherokee Ladies Quilting Group’ which is directed by Mrs. Joanne Sturrup. One of their latest quilts was for sale and the other for raffle.

The quilting group is very active in their quilt making and over the years has donated many quilts to charitable functions such as community fundraisers and to aid people in their medical expenses. An ongoing project is the making of prayer lap quilts for the sick and elderly.

In addition to the wonderful array of quilts was an equally stunning collection of other handicrafts which included appliqué work, crocheting, embroidery, cross stitch, petit point, Spanish weaving, drawn thread work and the more unusual handicrafts of tatting, ‘thumb’ and yo-yo.

The tatting lace work on display was made 60 years ago by Lee Pinder’s aunt. The workmanship in the doilies and lace edged hankies which was done using a series of minute knots and loops was unbelievably fine and delicate.

Lee explained that the ‘Thumb’ hot pads were made with very tiny pieces of cloth folded several times to form points and then all stitched together while the ‘Yo-yo’ quilts which were 40 years old were made with little cloth circles stitched and then gathered around the edges to form ‘yo-yos’ then all hand stitched together. Altogether the show was quite an eye opening and learning experience.

Lee Pinder also took on the role of waitress for the day in the mock ‘English tearoom’ which she had set up at the back of the hall with little tables adorned with attractive tablecloths and vases of fresh flowers. There one could order tea, coffee or lemonade which was served in beautiful china cups and saucers along with fancy chocolate cookies.

Outside the community centre people gathered under the almond tree to enjoy fellowshipping with each other and partaking of the hamburgers and hot dogs grilled by members of the Scurvy Few Motorcycle Club and also all of the other delicious home-baked goodies. Handcrafted items by Vonda Bethel, Corella Sands and Liz Key were also on sale.

Suzy Kirkaldy, a second homeowner who is a portrait artist, was happy to donate her time and talents towards the fundraiser. She drew pencil portraits of anyone who cared to sit for the 10 min it would take for her to complete one of these excellent keepsakes.

Proceeds from this unique event were in aid of the Cherokee Clinic project. Construction of the new clinic has begun and additional funds are urgently needed.

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