Home / Lifestyles / Youth / Agape Christian School Science Fair shows students’ concern for marine environment
On October 18, from 2:00pm to 2:45pm, Agape Christian School’s Grace Gymnasium was transformed into a science projects exhibition site. Many of the exhibits reflected the students’ concern of negative human impact on the marine environment. Human Impact on Marine Resources, Oil Spills’ Effect on Marine Life and Pollution Affecting Marine Life, among other topics, were the subjects of research by students from grades 4 to 11.

Agape Christian School Science Fair shows students’ concern for marine environment

Students display their work at the Agape Science Fair.
Students display their work at the Agape Science Fair.

On October 18, from 2:00pm to 2:45pm, Agape Christian School’s Grace Gymnasium was transformed into a science projects exhibition site. Many of the exhibits reflected the students’ concern of negative human impact on the marine environment.

Human Impact on Marine Resources, Oil Spills’ Effect on Marine Life and Pollution Affecting Marine Life, among other topics, were the subjects of research by students from grades 4 to 11.

Students had to resolve a specific question on a topic of their choice. Their assignment was to answer the question through hands-on observation and information.

The exhibits were made of cardboard, with photos illustrating the subject and a detailed description of the research written on paper or poster. Some had live exhibits, such as Alexander Sawyer and Robert Lightbourn, who had brought a tank containing hermit crabs. Their topic: What is a soldier crab’s favorite food?

Other live exhibits addressed oil spills. The students showed that oil floated on top of the water, trapping marine life underneath.

The egg-drop project was demonstrated by Walker Wong.  His point was to show that an egg dropped several feet on Rice Crispies or cotton will not break. Lima Bean seedlings growing in jars stood in front of Mahana Khan’s exhibit. She wanted to find out which was the best liquid for seeds to grow in; her choices were milk, sweet tea, club soda or water. After recording the seeds’ development rate in each media, she observed that sweet tea was the best medium.

Nathan Albury wanted to demonstrate that by adding oil, colors mixed themselves in milk without stirring.

Cierra Carroll, Krishan Mather, Zoya Thompson, Leslie Archer, Marvin Cash and Natanya Sweeting, a group of grade 10 students, showed how pollution affected the marine population.

Another pollution concern was expressed by Raquel Albury and Joshua Bonamy. They built a battery operated engine; operated by a switch to demonstrate what they thought would be an option to the gasoline engine used in boats, thus diminishing pollution.

For Caleb Johnson, three of the negative impacts on marine resources caused by humans were reef bleaching, oil spills and the introduction of invasive species such as the lion fish.

The above mentioned projects were only a few among a series of similar topics or other environmental observations. The students showed originality in the choice of their topics, as even similar topics were approached from different angles. They indicated that they had studied and done enough research to prove their demonstrations.

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