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According to the Royal Bahamas Police Force, while officers were on a "special duty police operation" they shot and killed a 35-year-old man near the Haitian shanty town called the Mudd on Wednesday January 23, 2013, around 7:45 p.m.

Shooting by Police leaves questions

According to the Royal Bahamas Police Force, while officers were on a “special duty police operation” they shot and killed a 35-year-old man near the Haitian shanty town called the Mudd on Wednesday January 23, 2013, around 7:45 p.m.

The family of the man, now identified as Job Munnings, a local reggae artist who went by the stage name ‘Mr. Versatile,’ claims they are getting conflicting reports about the incident, and believe officers shot an innocent man.

The Nassau Guardian Reported that Assistant Commissioner Emerick Seymour said “The individual attempted to disarm the officer and in the process the police firearm was discharged, killing the victim, who was pronounced dead on the scene a short time later by a local doctor on the island.”

Tabitha Munnings, the victim’s sister, said her brother was not a troublemaker. She said her family does not believe the account told by police about the shooting and wants answers to why Munnings was shot.

The family flew from Nassau to Abaco to meet with police on January 24 and then met with Commissioner of Police Ellison Greenslade on January 25. There have been no updates from the police on the outcome of those meetings.

“The inspector said to me they were conducting a patrol last night, at a dark building, and my brother and this guy [were there],” Ms. Munnings said. “The police approached the building and apparently my brother got into a struggle with the police and the gun miss and went off.”

She said police said her brother was shot twice in the chest.

“My question was, ‘If the gun miss and went off, how could he be shot in the chest twice?’ They said ‘investigations [are] pending; we’re looking more into it’,” she said. “I told them I wasn’t buying that story because it didn’t make sense.”

She said people who claimed they witnessed the shooting said her brother was an innocent man who walked into the line of fire.

“They didn’t say my brother was armed, they didn’t say they approached my bother to arrest my brother for so and so.”

Munnings said her brother was a musician who was often seen around town selling his music and he had two young children.

“He was a straightforward person; he would let you know what’s on his mind,” she said. “But he wasn’t a troublesome person. Many people here in Abaco said he was a humble person. He never bothered nobody; he just sold his DVDs.”

Munnings said her family wants the Royal Bahamas Police Force to properly investigate the shooting and provide justice.

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About Timothy Roberts

Timothy Roberts

Timothy had his first venture into Journalism just months after graduating from Queen’s College in Nassau taking his first job with The Tribune in 1991 leaving in 1992 for other pursuits.

During his time in Nassau he diversified his experiences working as a warehouse manager, locksmith and computer technician before returning to Abaco, a place he has always considered home, in 1999.

He joined the staff of The Abaconian in 2001 doing graphic design and writing an opinion article called Generally Speaking and after a brief time away, returned to The Abaconian in 2010 as a reporter, graphic designer and computer technician.

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