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Hole-in-the-Wall, the famous and historic landmark that jutted from the southern tip of Abaco, has been forever altered. The distinctive arch that formed a bridge from the mainland out to the rocky tip was the victim of extremely strong surges courtesy of Hurricane Sandy. What remains is a gap where the land-bridge once was suspended. White, un-weathered limestone now stands as a stark reminder of what once was.

Historic landmark gone after centuries of inspiring awe

Above: a forever altered Abaco landmark. Hurricane Sandy tore the limestone arch off its hinges and flung it into the ocean. Sketches and descriptions of this natural formation go back centuries. This photo is courtesy of John Haestad.

Hole-in-the-Wall, the famous and historic landmark that jutted from the southern tip of Abaco, has been forever altered. The distinctive arch that formed a bridge from the mainland out to the rocky tip was the victim of extremely strong surges courtesy of Hurricane Sandy. What remains is a gap where the land-bridge once was suspended. White, un-weathered limestone now stands as a stark reminder of what once was.

The Hole-in-the-Wall Lighthouse was not damaged during the storm.
Effects of erosion and weathering could be seen on the arch at Hole-in-the-Wall for some time. Bright white limestone appeared as small chunks fell into the roaring ocean below. Many speculated that in another century or two the distinctive feature would be gone.

This abrupt change, however, came as a shock.

Sketches dating back to the 1800’s clearly show that sailors of old were as captivated with the landmark as many visitors of today were. This rugged feature was one of the most stunning views and displays of natural beauty on Abaco or anywhere in The Bahamas. And while not nearly as easy to visit as Abaco’s many beaches, it had its tourist appeal as well for adventure seekers.

Many local Abaconians marked the location as a favourite picnic site as well. The open ocean to the south and the crashing water provided a dramatic reminder of what the island was before people settled it. The Hole-in-the-Wall’s feature, the arch, stood not only as a bridge from the mainland to the southernmost point but also as a bridge between Abaco’s present and past.
Despite its descriptive name, Hole-in-the-Wall was anything but empty.


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About Bradley Albury

Bradley Albury
Editor-in-Chief of The Abaconian.

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One comment

  1. Interesting news. A historic navigation landmark and ice-age geographical feature gone for good… For more on this story, the last (probably) photo before Sandy struck, the first (probably) published image (1803) and the history of Hole-in-the-Wall in maps since 1737, see http://rollingharbour.com

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